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Articles Tagged With “AGM”

Battery Basics: A Layman's Guide to Batteries

If you’ve done any research on how batteries work or what you should look for when selecting a battery, you’re probably buried in information, some of which is conflicting. At BatteryStuff, we aim to clear that up a bit. You’ve most likely heard the term KISS (Keep It Simple, Stupid). I’m going to attempt to explain how lead acid batteries work and what they need, without burying you with a bunch of needless technical data. I have found that battery data will vary somewhat from manufacturer to manufacturer, so I will do my best to boil that data down. This means I may generalize a bit, while staying true to purpose. more...

Gel vs AGM: Not Quite the Battle of the Ages, But Nice to Know

More often than not AGM Batteries are mistakenly identified as Gel Cell Batteries. Both batteries have similar traits; such as being non spillable, deep cycle, may be mounted in any position, low self discharge, safe for use in limited ventilation areas, and may be transported via Air or Ground safely without special handling. more...

The Super Secret Workings of a Lead Acid Battery Explained

A 12-volt motorcycle battery is made up of a plastic case containing six cells. Each cell is made up of a set of positive and negative plates immersed in a dilute sulfuric acid solution known as electrolyte, and each cell has a voltage of around 2.1 volts when fully charged. The six cells are connected together to produce a fully charged battery of about 12.6 volts. That's great, but how does sticking lead plates into sulfuric acid produce electricity? more...

Troubleshooting a Battery

One of the facts of life is that batteries fail. Some take years, but eventually they will all bite the dust. However, there are so many factors in electrical systems that can go wrong, that often times the battery takes the blame for other component's problems. The easiest and fastest thing to check for problems is the battery. Here is a simple test that can tell you a lot about what is going on inside a battery, and whether it is good or not. This is not meant to test anything other than the battery, but it is a great place to start if you are having electrical problems. more...

How to Pick the Right Battery Charger

There are certainly other factors in selecting a battery charger, and it would be difficult to cover them all, but here a few. Input voltage, generally for use foreign countries. Exposure to elements, i.e. would you benefit from a waterproof charger? Perhaps you will need a charger that doubles as a power supply for a RV or some other application. Often people will need to charge multiple batteries simultaneously, so multiple bank chargers may be needed. more...

I Need a Gel Cell Battery. Why Do You Only Sell AGM Powersports Batteries?

Gel battery technology was developed prior to AGM (Absorbed Glass Matt) battery technology and the term “Gel” is now often used generically, albeit incorrectly, to described sealed batteries. AGM is simply superior in this application. We've heard many times "But my dealer says...". In this one instance, your dealer is mistaken. AGM's rule! more...

Why is My 12 Volt Battery Reading as 13 Volts?

All Lead acid batteries (Gel, AGM, Flooded, Drycell, etc) are made up of a series of 2.2 volt cells that are bridged together in series to reach their final desired voltage. more...

AGM Battery Visual Tour

The Absorbed Glass Matte is a type of Lead Acid Battery. The plates inside the battery cells are covered with active materials, and when a load is applied, the electrolyte in the glass matte allows for easy discharge of electrons. What does this mean? Watch to find out! more...

Glossary

A list of common technical terms and definitions referring to batteries, chargers, and electricity in general. This is a good place to start if you want to learn how to interpret the specifications on most of our products. more...

Calculator | Determine Run Time for Specific Load

This calculator is intended to help you figure out how long your lead-acid (Wet, AGM, Gel) battery will last under a specified load. In order to use this calculator you will need two separate AH ratings, given by the manufacturer, as well as the amperage, in direct current of your load. For an explanation of why a calculator is necessary to figure out the true run time of your battery see Puekert’s Law. more...

Calculator | Sizing a 12 Volt Battery to a Load

Do you need a 12 volt battery for your application but don't know what size? This calculator is designed to help you find a deep cycle battery when a continuous load is applied, not for cranking or starting purposes. If you know how much power your application takes to run, and the time you would like to run it, we'll recommend a 12 volt battery with a safe amount of AH (Amp Hours) that will give you the run time you need. more...

Math Behind the Magic

Here are the formulas our calculators take into consideration while computing. What? You thought we would show our work step by step? You’re welcome to do it longhand if you like, but personally, I like my calculators better. more...

Peukert’s Law | A Nerd’s Attempt to Explain Battery Capacity

When I first entered the arena of lead acid batteries and their neurotic tendencies, it was presented to me that the easiest way to rate and understand how long a lead-acid battery would last, would be to use the AH (Amp Hour) rating that is so often designated to them. I was told that if a battery was rated at 100AH, then that was more or less indicative that it would last either 100 hours under a 1 amp load, or 1 hour under a 100 amp load. It soon became apparent that this notion of order was false; everything previously understood had been a lie. more...

What is the Difference Between the Terminal Type F1 and F2?

The SLA batteries we sell, up to 12 volts 15 Amp Hours (AH), commonly use the faston tabs as the terminal type. The F1 and the F2 are the terms we use to refer to the terminals. At first glance, they look very similar. These are flat blade type terminals which stick up at an angle from the top or side of the battery. These terminal types are designed to be attached with a push-on spade insert, either for your application or for charging. The F1 terminal is thinner, and the F2 is wider. more...

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